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Throughout their short history, video games have posed challenges to intellectual property laws. This chapter explores how courts in the United States have struggled to apply traditional laws of copyright to video games.

Greg Lastowka, Blogger

September 5, 2013

1 Min Read

Hi Gamasutrans --

I've posted a draft chapter on the history of copyright law and videogames to the Social Science Research Network. 

Here's the link.

Here's the abstract:

Throughout their short history, video games have posed challenges to intellectual property laws. This chapter explores how courts in the United States have struggled to apply traditional laws of copyright to video games given that video games, like all games, are interactive processes. Players of video games both experience the games and perform them during the course of play. From the perspective of copyright law, the interactive nature of video games undermines the authorial control of the game creator, who does not created a single scripted experience, but instead designs an interactive system. This interactivity opens another copyright possibility: an authorial role for players.

Comments are welcome.

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About the Author(s)

Greg Lastowka

Blogger

Greg Lastowka is a Professor of Law at Rutgers School of Law-Camden and a co-founder of the Terra Nova weblog. His research focuses on the laws of intellectual property and new technology. You can find him on the web at http://lastowka.rutgers.edu/

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