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The Benefits of Video Games in Education

Video games have immeasurable positive potential alongside to their entertainment value. Studies have consistently demonstrated that playing computer games can result in reduced reaction times, better hand-eye co-ordination and a rise in self-esteem for p

Alice Winter

October 17, 2016

2 Min Read

 

The Benefits of Video Games in Education

Video games have immeasurable positive potential alongside to their entertainment value. Studies have consistently demonstrated that playing computer games can result in reduced reaction times, better hand-eye co-ordination and a rise in self-esteem for players.

It is important to evaluate the extent that video game technology impacts childhood education. Since this type of technology has the ability to engage children in learning activities, there has been a sharp rise in the ‘edu-tainment’ industry.

Evidence implies that essential skills may be reinforced by videogame technology, skills such as spatial awareness may improve greatly when playing video games.

An article from PsychCentral discusses how video games that energize players and facilitate a positive mood could also enhance creativity (Nauert, 2008). The author also explains that research has found that players who were not highly energized and had a negative mood, registered the highest creativity, ““When you are highly aroused, the energy itself acts as a catalyst, and the happy mood acts as an encouragement. It is like being in a zone where you cannot be thrown off your game”.

It is suggested that "a negative mood, especially when there is low arousal, brings a different kind of energy that makes a person more analytical, which is crucial to creativity as well."

According to new research by Michigan State University, both boys and girls who play video games tend to be more creative. In a study of nearly 500 12 year olds, it was found that “the more kids played video games, the more creative they were in tasks such as drawing pictures and writing stories. In contrast, use of cell phones, the Internet and computers (other than for video games) was unrelated to creativity.”(Science Daily, 2011)

Professor of Psychology, Linda Jackson, hopes that these findings will motivate game designers to identify the aspects of video game activity that are responsible for the creative effects.

 


References:
Science Daily (2011) Michigan State University. "Video game playing tied to creativity, research shows." [online] http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111102125355.htm

Nauert, R. (2008) Video Games Can Aid Creativity. [online] http://psychcentral.com/news/2008/05/26/video-games-can-aid-creativity/2353.html

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