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Discord will let developers monetize their apps

App developers in the US, UK, and Europe can now make some money from their product on Discord, provided they meet the chat app's three requirements.

Justin Carter

October 19, 2023

2 Min Read
Logo for Discord.

Discord is expanding its subscription service for Premium Apps to include the UK and Europe. The feature was originally unveiled for the US, and lets developers monetize their apps by offering high-end features via app subscriptions. 

The popular chat app has been making moves to draw in more subscribers and developers with expanded community offerings and subscription programs for servers. And with game developers shifting over from forums to Discord as their primary avenues of communication, the move couldn't be more well-timed.

"For developers, Premium App Subscriptions enables effortless setup, end-to-end transactions, smart SKU management, multiple payment options, and a frictionless user experience," wrote Discord. "We plan to continue to expand availability to help developers generate revenue directly on Discord."

To get an app to premium status, developers have to pass Discord's automated checks, add a premium SKU for users to subscribe to, and make $100 to secure eligibility. After a review is conducted, the creators will begin receiving payouts.

Discord's app-related plans also involve making apps easier to launch on PC and mobile, beginning activities directly from group chats, and "exploring ways for you to add your apps wherever you’re hanging out on Discord."

Discord goes deeper on teen user safety

Along with the app subscriptions, Discord's launching a Teen Safety Assist (TSA) initiative which will "protect teens through a series of proactive filters and alerts." By default, its filters will detect if a safety alert should be sent to a teen user when they receive a DM for the first time, and automatically blur sensitive media in DMs and group chats (both for friend groups and individual servers).

Next week, a new warning system will give users "multiple touchpoints to clearly understand rule violations and the consequences of their actions." Similar to Xbox's recently implemented strike enforcement policy, the touchpoints aim to give users more transparency on their inappropriate behavior and their repercussions. 

An in-app DM will be the first touchpoint, along with a detailed list of how said rules were broken. Actions and account restrictions will also be outlined in that list, and users will be able to see that and past infractions in an "account standing" tab. 

For more serious violations, such as violent extremism and sexual content involving children, Discord will have a zero-tolerance policy. Depending on the violation, it will "take appropriate action depending on the severity of the violation." 

The warning system and TSA both appear in response to a report from June alleging Discord was being used as a hub for child exploitation. That report highlighted the chat app's blind spots, such as its response time to complaints about inappropriate material and adults luring young users to their servers. 

More information on Discord's future plans can be read here.

About the Author(s)

Justin Carter

Contributing Editor, GameDeveloper.com

A Kansas City, MO native, Justin Carter has written for numerous sites including IGN, Polygon, and SyFy Wire. In addition to Game Developer, his writing can be found at io9 over on Gizmodo. Don't ask him about how much gum he's had, because the answer will be more than he's willing to admit.

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