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Composer Winifred Phillips answers Reddit's questions in viral Ask-Me-Anything about video game music

Game composer Winifred Phillips' Reddit AMA went viral last week, hitting the Reddit front page, receiving 14.8k upvotes & garnering gold & platinum awards to become one of the most engaged and popular Reddit gaming AMAs. Read excerpts from the Q&A.
Photo of popular video game composer Winifred Phillips, taken as 'proof photo' for her recent viral Reddit Ask-Me-Anything that hit the Reddit front page, receiving 14.8 thousand upvotes and garnering Reddit's gold and platinum awards.
By Winifred Phillips | Contact | Follow

 

Glad you're here!  I'm video game music composer Winifred Phillips, and I'm the author of the book A Composer's Guide to Game Music.  Recently my publisher The MIT Press requested that I host a question and answer session on Reddit's famous Ask Me Anything forum, to share my knowledge about game music and spread the word about my book on that topic.  I'd be answering questions from a community consisting of thousands of gamers, developers and aspiring composers.  It sounded like fun, so last Thursday and Friday I logged onto Reddit and answered as many questions as I possibly could.  It was an awesome experience!  Over the course of those two days, my Reddit AMA went viral.  It ascended to the Reddit front page, receiving 14.8 thousand upvotes and garnering Reddit's gold and platinum awards.  I'm so grateful to the Reddit community for their amazing support and enthusiasm!!  During the course of those two days, the community posed some wonderful questions, and I thought it would be great to gather together some of those questions and answers that might interest us here at Gamasutra.  Below you'll find a discussion focused on the art and craft of game music composition.  The discussion covered the gamut of subjects, from elementary to expert, and I've arranged the discussion below under topic headings for the sake of convenience.  I hope you enjoy this excerpted Q&A from my Reddit Ask-Me-Anything!  If you'd like to read the entire AMA (which also includes lots of discussion of my past video game music projects), you'll find the whole Reddit AMA here.

 

Questions about workflow

Question: I am really curious to learn what the process of developing music for a game is. I know with film media, musical directors get footage to create along with, how does this process work for games?

Winifred Phillips: You're right about the process with film media. It's a spotting procedure, wherein the director and composer go through the film and look for good opportunities to place music in positions that will have maximum impact. I think that there's a similar philosophy behind how music is placed in games. The game development team and the composer make decisions about where music is going to be most impactful. The difference is that we can't just watch the game all the way through, the way we might watch a film. Instead, we can look at the design documents, look at the currently built levels at whatever stage of development they're currently in, and make decisions based on that. The dev team usually has strong ideas about the role of music in their project, and how they want the music to interact with their game. Sometimes I'll have more input regarding these choices, and other times the team will be fired up about their vision for the role that music will play, and I'll need to execute that vision.

Image illustrating the concept of workflow, from the article by game composer Winifred Phillips about her Reddit AMA that went viral, hitting the Reddit front page, with 14.8 thousand upvotes and both Reddit's gold and platinum awards.Question: When composing, what kind of details are important to ensure it fits the game? Do you play through a scene without music before working on the piece?

Winifred Phillips: Cool question! I always love receiving a build of the game while I'm working so that I can play it and get inspired by what the development team is doing. That's not always possible, though. Sometimes the game is just too early in development for me to receive a playable version. In that case, I read all sorts of design documents, look at tons of concept art, have lots of great meetings with the developers to talk about what inspires them and what their vision is for the music of their game. I'll also do a bunch of research before I begin work. The research sometimes focuses on musical style, genre, instrumentation, etc. Sometimes the research also includes topics related to the game narrative and history. I want to understand the world of the game, so that I can create music that's appropriate for it.

Question: How is your typical workflow when writing music for a new scene/part of a game? Like; play the scene once, fiddle around with some melodies, record a quick piece and let it sit for a few days and so on.

Winifred Phillips: I like to watch gameplay video or play a game build (if there's one available) before I start work. Every piece of gameplay has its own visual rhythm, and that has a profound influence on the pacing and momentum of the music I'll create for it. Regarding how I schedule my work -- usually I'm operating on some An image of the Assassin's Creed Liberation HD cover art, illustrating the discussion in the article by popular video game music composer Winifred Phillipspretty tight deadlines, so I rarely have the luxury to set a piece aside and then come back to it. The music must be finished! The deadline gods will be satisfied! Honestly, there's nothing more inspiring than that terrifying ticking of the clock counting down to a deadline. I amaze myself with how much I can get done.

Question: I’m interested in your work on God of War and Assassin’s Creed. Those are two, for the most part, period pieces. Do you try and incorporate instruments or styles of music from ancient times? If so, how do you choose where to have modern/period music?  As a second question; how much creative freedom do you have? Do it vary gig to gig?

Winifred Phillips: Good questions!  I enjoy working on period pieces, because I get to do research and incorporate instruments and performance styles from another time. For Assassin's Creed Liberation, I dug deep into baroque musical structures and instruments, and I learned a -lot- from the experience of creating the music for that game. For God of War I listened to a lot of world music from the locations where the game is based. Of course, we don't really know what the ancient music of Sparta would have sounded like, although there are some guesses being made. Regarding creative freedom -- you are absolutely right. It varies from gig to gig. I've worked on some gigs where the team just gave me their blessing and told me to do whatever I liked. I've also worked on projects where the development team closely supervised everything I did and had detailed instructions at every step of the project. It's important to be able to adapt to whatever the circumstances may be.

Questions about working with development teams

Question: I would consider the music to be a huge part of the feel of any good game; considering what you just said about not having the ability to play a piece of the game before you compose, would you say that you have some creative license to sway the tone and feel of a game? I understand you want to help the game become what it’s supposed to become but sometimes a little creativity can help make the game into something more.

Winifred Phillips: You're right about the creative license that composers sometimes have to define the sound of a game. When we're brought in before the levels are finished, our music might actually have a big impact on the design of those levels. For instance, after I was hired to compose music for LittleBigPlanet 2, my first assignment was to create music for the Victoria's Lab level, and I was given the description of the main character as a sort of mad scientist figure. She likes to build killer robots, and she's a bit nuts. Always a delightful combination! So I composed a track with a lot of dark elements -- gritty guitars, epic orchestral strings, etc. But since it's also a LittleBigPlanet track, I made sure to infuse it with a lot of fun and wacky elements, like calliope, accordion, beat boxing, vocoder, and so on. Later, I found out that after I'd submitted the music, the level designers had gone back to the drawing board and revised the level pretty extensively. When I finally saw the level, Victoria was still a mad scientist, but now she was also a baker. The level was filled with cookies and cakes, and Sackboy could attack the killer robots by hurling giant cupcakes at them. The team at Media Molecule let me know that they'd changed the level because the music had inspired them. I can't express how much that meant to me. The folks at Media Molecule are profoundly gifted and amazing, so I was so touched that my contribution helped to shape their creative process!  Here's a vid of that music:

 

Question: I am a 29 year old who literally loves little big planet! Is there ever a time where you would feel like the music wasn't right for the game and you were forced to pick it because of the director or developer?

Depiction of the famous Sackboy character from the LittleBigPlanet 2 franchise, from the article by video game music composer Winifred Phillips.Winifred Phillips: Nothing wrong with being 29 and loving LittleBigPlanet! I love it too! Regarding your question -- I've been asked sometimes to deliver music that seems like sort of an eccentric choice for the game in question. But in those moments, I think it's important to remember that the dev team knows their game a lot better than I do. They know their audience. They also know the overall effect they're trying to create with the music of the game. Creative collaboration doesn't work unless everybody trusts everybody else. I just have to metaphorically close my eyes and do a 'trust fall' in those circumstances. The final result is almost always fantastic!

Question: In projects where the sound design team and music team are not really coordinating wth each other, how do you ensure the music produced and evaluated stays on brand for a project?

Winifred Phillips: I know what you mean. Really, the sound design team and music team ought to be coordinating with each other! At the very least, there should be some kind of supervisor in the team that's keeping an eye on those things and making sure that the music and sound design work together. In most projects I've worked on, that's the case. However, I also like to ask the team to send me videos of gameplay that include the sound design. That way, I can drop the video with its sound design into my Pro Tools session and hear the sounds of the game while I'm creating the music. This helps me create music that isn't going to clash with the other aural elements in the game.

 

Questions about dynamic / interactive music composition

Question: What would you consider the main difference between game music and normal music?

Winifred Phillips: Well, normal music has a beginning, that proceeds to a middle, and then concludes with an ending. Game music usually doesn't have any of those things. At its simplest, game music is composed so that it can be repeated indefinitely, which means that it must be composed with a very different composition structure than traditional music. As game composers, we have to think about what qualities will help players to enjoy a piece of music that repeats, and what qualities will lessen that enjoyment. Beyond this simplest of considerations, as game music gets more interactive and responsive to the actions of the player, the whole situation grows exponentially more complex. The music starts getting fragmented into many different segments that can be juggled around according to the action of the game. It can be very challenging for a traditional composer to understand how fundamentally different game music composition is.

Question: Is making game music different from making regular music, is there a guideline to follow?

Winifred Phillips: Regarding making game music -- it couldn't be -more- different than making regular music! Game music is very distinct. The demands on the composer are very different than they would be for a film or television composer, or even for a symphonic composer. Game music has to be interactive. It has to react An illustration emphasizing the importance of gamer choice, from a discussion of game music in an article by Winifred Phillips (video game composer) -- the article includes materials from her recent Reddit Ask-Me-Anything that received 14.8 thousand upvotes, helping it to reach the Reddit front page and garner both Reddit's gold and platinum awards.to the actions of the player. That's actually really inspiring to me. I feel like I'm having a sort of musical conversation with players. They perform actions, and the music responds. Hopefully the music inspires players on their in-game journey. In terms of the technical aspects, game music has to be constructed in bits and pieces, that can be jig-sawed together by the game engine according to what's going on in the game. I go into a lot of detail about this in my book -- it's a fascinating way to think about music creation, and it's really inspired me to stretch and grow as a composer.

Question: How do you manage to get certain feelings (tension, etc) to change over time during certain songs? Such as going into combat or coming out of it.

Winifred Phillips: Good question! When we're structuring music for a game, we'll assign different tasks to different compositions. A track may be assigned the task of accompanying the player during exploration. Another track may be assigned to a specific combat sequence. When transitioning from exploration into combat, often the game engine may trigger a specifically-composed transitional composition to play. This may be a short track that helps to ease the player from one piece of music to another, smoothing out the rough edges and helping the transition to feel natural.

Question: So do you ever end up with situations where the game itself is resolving chord progressions or making harmonic functional type changes where you compose something that has a series of chords but they end on what is to be a transition to another section that the gameplay or some kind of randomness might chose where the progression goes next? (so for example like the game itself would chose whether you end up with a cadence or go to another chord which might resolve to something else etc? ) Or is this more of "one theme" and then the game action will trade for "another theme..." but the functions are more or less contained? (and if the answer is NO? Wouldnt it be so cool to for a composer to be involved with game developers to design a game that way!? eg the player would be literally working to resolve tension in the music !)

Winifred Phillips: Wonderful question! What you're describing is the technique and core philosophy of interactive/dynamic music construction. It's challenging for a game composer, but also incredibly stimulating and inspiring. Kind of like trying to solve a really good puzzle. Composing interactive music for a game often requires a game composer to construct the harmonic progressions so that they can transition in several different optional directions -- allowing the game engine to pick and choose depending on what's happening in the game. To make this happen, the composer records the music in separate distinct segments, and the game engine picks and chooses the segments according to what's happening during gameplay. It's a complicated subject -- I actually produced a series of four tutorial videos about it in connection with my book, A Composer's Guide to Game Music. Here's the first video:

 

Question: I'm working on a retro shooter at the moment and I had an idea to do things that were constructed less from the perspective of whole pieces of music that would fade into one another, but rather as bite-sized function-focused chunks that would be triggered as players entered from one zone to another, confronted enemies, etc. My question for you has to do with interactivity of music and how you design your layers when constructing an adaptive score. Have you ever used level layout and player progress through a level as a way of dictating which layers are faded in/out? If so, are there any best practices you've come up with for the process?

Winifred Phillips: Sounds like you're putting together either a Horizontal Resequencing system or a system based on the triggering of stingers -- not sure which, but either choice is cool. Regarding the layering music system you described... I talk about Vertical Layering a bunch in my book. One of my first experiences with it was for The Maw video game from Twisted Pixel games. Level layout and player progress were both determining factors when making choices about where layers would be triggered and manipulated. The system had three layers of dynamic music per composition -- a layer for slapstick situations, a layer for exploring, and a layer for special circumstances (like flying, fighting, or fire breathing). Depending on where the player was or what the player was doing, the layers would turn on and off or adjust their volume up and down. When I was planning out this system, I combed through the game for good triggering points and drew up a sort-of roadmap for the audio implementation at Twisted Pixel, so they'd know how the music should behave during gameplay. Here's a video of some gameplay from The Maw:

 

Questions about the creative composition process for video game music

Question: What is your normal first step in creating a composition for a new project? Do you always approach things in a particular order or with a specific method? I'm interested to hear how your process begins for a new piece.

Winifred Phillips: Hey, what a fascinating question! My process for composition is going to depend a lot on the preferences of the development team. Their working method has a lot of influence over mine. They'll tell me which tracks they want me to compose first. They'll give me instruction about style. They'll lay out preferences for the way they want the music to interact with gameplay. All of that has to come into consideration in my composition process. I want to make sure my music is serving their vision. Otherwise, my creative process tends to change with each project, depending on the nature of the music in question. Sometimes I plan things out very meticulously, so that I'll have a very clear idea of what every instrument is doing right from my initial piano sketches. Other times, I just launch right in with instrumental experimentation, like a painter throwing paint on the canvas just to see what happens. It really depends on the nature of the project. :)

Question: Hi! How do you find inspiration for particular melodies/musical themes? Do you just fiddle around until there's a lightbulb moment? Also, how much of a role do themes/leitmotifs play in game composition, because they can make or break films when applied incorrectly/inconsistently.

The cover of the book A Composer's Guide to Game Music, as discussed in this article written by popular game composer Winifred Phillips -- the article included excerpts from her recent Reddit Ask-Me-Anything that reached the Reddit front page, garnered Reddit's gold and platinum awards and received 14.8 thousand upvotes.Winifred Phillips: Hey, that's a really good point! I spend a chapter of my book, A Composer's Guide to Game Music, on the importance of musical themes in games. I think that themes can play a pivotal role in helping gamers to fully appreciate a game's narrative. They can also step forward and communicate important information to the player about what gameplay objectives to pursue, and what threats may exist. I try to compose musical themes for all my projects, but the importance of thematic content can hinge on how the development team feels about that idea. They may not be excited about themes, and that's okay. Not every musical score needs to be highly melodic in order to be effective. But themes can be really powerful, so I always try to incorporate them. When I'm composing music for a game, I try to save the big story-driven moments for later in music production. I like to compose exploration and combat music first. These tracks give me lots of opportunity to experiment with themes. Inevitably, some themes will leap out and shine. I'll use those themes in the narrative-driven parts of the game, associating them with characters and situations. This tends to bind the gameplay and the story together really nicely.

Question: I love leitmotifs and recurring themes in music, but there have been cases like on Yoshi’s Island 3ds where the same tune was used too much and the music became repetitive and annoying. How do you find the balance between underusing and overusing recurring themes and how many leitmotifs do usually use per game?

Winifred Phillips: You make a good point -- repetition fatigue is a HUGE issue in our work as game composers. I talk about repetition fatigue repeatedly in my book A Composer's Guide to Game Music (in chapters 4, 9, 10 and 12). Avoiding repetition fatigue is incredibly tricky. Regarding how many leitmotifs and recurring themes do I use... that varies per project. For instance, my music for the Speed Racer game only had a couple of recurring themes, but my music for Assassin's Creed Liberation had -loads- of them. I think the depth and complexity of the narrative can exert an influence on how many leitmotifs and themes would work successfully. If the story has lots of characters and explores a lot of important issues and ideas, then it will probably be able to support a large assortment of themes. Otherwise, it might make more sense to use fewer themes and associate them with only the most important aspects of the game.

 

Advice for breaking into the industry as a young game composer

Question: Do you have any advice for a composer in college who’s just starting their career?

Illustration to support a discussion of opportunities for aspiring game composers in the university setting, from the article by game music composer Winifred Phillips -- the article includes excerpts from her recent Reddit Ask-Me-Anything that received Reddit's gold and platinum awards, received 14.8 thousand upvotes and reached the Reddit front page.Winifred Phillips: Thanks for the question. If you're in a college w

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