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LeapFrog Announces Web Connected Learning Handhelds

Technology-based learning company Leapfrog has announced two new web-connected video game systems for kids' educational needs: The Leapster2 Learning Game System and the Didj Custom Gaming System, both of which connect to a web-based parents' tool to help

Leigh Alexander

February 5, 2008

1 Min Read

Technology-based learning company LeapFrog has announced two new web-connected video game systems for kids' educational needs: The Leapster2 Learning Game System and the Didj Custom Gaming System. The Leapster2 Learning Game System allows online gameplay with learning-based activities and rewards aimed to allow parents to see what their child is learning. The Didj Custom Gaming System connects gameplay with schoolwork online, allowing grade-schoolers to customize the game with spelling lists, math problems and more. Both of the two systems tie in to the company's proprietary Learning Path, a free web-based tool that interfaces with LeapFrog products so that parents can track how kids' activities map back to educational skills. LeapFrog released the original Leapster handheld gaming system in 2004. The company says that since then, nearly 5 million Leapster family hardware units and over 14 million software titles have sold in the United States. The system is designed for smaller hands, featuring a bigger D-pad and larger buttons as well as an attached stylus. LeapFrog gaming vice president Christian Cocks said, "LeapFrog is the leader in educational handheld gaming and now with Leapster2 and Didj, we are offering parents and kids even more choice and capability. Kids want to play video games, and as parents we want them to get the most from that experience. Our new Leapster2 and Didj handhelds are products that parents can feel good about and that kids can have a terrific time playing."

About the Author(s)

Leigh Alexander

Contributor

Leigh Alexander is Editor At Large for Gamasutra and the site's former News Director. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Variety, Slate, Paste, Kill Screen, GamePro and numerous other publications. She also blogs regularly about gaming and internet culture at her Sexy Videogameland site. [NOTE: Edited 10/02/2014, this feature-linked bio was outdated.]

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