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Independent developer Mousechief (Dangerous High School Girls in Trouble) has announced it has received a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trade Office for a specific game mechanic it employed in its title The Witch's Yarn to control interact

Leigh Alexander, Contributor

January 4, 2008

1 Min Read

Independent developer Mousechief has announced it has received a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trade Office for a specific game mechanic it employed in its title The Witch's Yarn. Mousechief describes the patented mechanic as one controlling interactive narratives that are noun-based and hinge on brief conversational exchanges. In addition to The Witch's Yarn, which was a 2006 Independent Games Festival finalist, Mousechief has also developed 2007 IGF entry Dangerous High School Girls in Trouble, which the developer says does not use the patented narrative mechanic, and a puzzle game titled Fruit-o-Matic. Said Nemitz, "Nowadays, patents are often abused. They are used to control innovation, stifle it, or obtain income from lawsuits instead of from the invention itself. However, individuals still rely on patents for public recognition and protection from exploitation."

About the Author(s)

Leigh Alexander

Contributor

Leigh Alexander is Editor At Large for Gamasutra and the site's former News Director. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Variety, Slate, Paste, Kill Screen, GamePro and numerous other publications. She also blogs regularly about gaming and internet culture at her Sexy Videogameland site. [NOTE: Edited 10/02/2014, this feature-linked bio was outdated.]

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