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Over 90 million players have downloaded Nintendo's full mobile debut, Super Mario Run, but only 3 million have actually paid to unlock the full game.

Chris Kerr, News Editor

January 4, 2017

1 Min Read

Over 90 million players have downloaded Nintendo's full mobile debut, Super Mario Run, but only 3 million have actually paid to unlock the full game.

That's according to new data from analytics outfit Newzoo, which handed the latest figures over to the Wall Street Journal

If those figures hold true, it means the iOS-exclusive platformer (an Android release is expected in the near future) may have generated around $30 million in revenue, given that the game retails for $10. Presumably not all of that went directly into Nintendo's coffers, since Apple is almost certainly taking a cut of the game's proceeds.

That 3 percent conversion rate might sound low, but it's worth remembering that other big mobile developers such as Candy Crush creator King have very similar rates.

For example, paying customers accounted for 2.07 percent of King's total audience in Q4 2015, just before it was acquired by Activision. 

King also generally employs more traditional free-to-play models, as opposed to Nintendo, which asked players to fork over a one-time fee to unlock Super Mario Run. And unlike some of the other big mobile studios, Nintendo is looking to crack the home and portable console markets as well. 

It means the company will have its own unique barometer for mobile "success," as was shown late last year when Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto explained the firm hopes its mobile offerings will ultimately widen its console audience by introducing new players to their biggest franchises.

Update: This story has been updated to clarify that while Super Mario Run has presumably generated roughly $30 million in revenue so far, Nintendo will likely only see a portion of those earnings.

About the Author(s)

Chris Kerr

News Editor, GameDeveloper.com

Game Developer news editor Chris Kerr is an award-winning journalist and reporter with over a decade of experience in the game industry. His byline has appeared in notable print and digital publications including Edge, Stuff, Wireframe, International Business Times, and PocketGamer.biz. Throughout his career, Chris has covered major industry events including GDC, PAX Australia, Gamescom, Paris Games Week, and Develop Brighton. He has featured on the judging panel at The Develop Star Awards on multiple occasions and appeared on BBC Radio 5 Live to discuss breaking news.

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