informa
2 min read
article

Papers, Please and Ludic Narrative

Much has been made of the ludic/narrative divide in theoretical approaches to game design, either from a purist perspective (Espen Aarseth) or a hybrid cultural approach (Rune Klevjer). This brief essay compares these approaches through Papers, Please.

In the roughly 10 years since its release, I have used MGS3 as my go-­to example for the  power of video games to people who do not regularly or have never played them, largely  because it follows the classical style so closely. Much like any Mario game, MGS3 presents to  the player a linear narrative through which the player approaches major challenges (i.e. boss  battles) in a set order, while giving the player certain mechanical freedoms set around these  scheduled narrative moments. The narrative for the original Super Mario Bros. for the NES is a  perfect example, pure in its utter simplicity: Bowser, King Koopa, has kidnapped Princess  Toadstool. You, as the plumber Mario, must fulfill your duty in rescuing her and returning her to  her castle. The brilliance of this bare­bones story is in the tension it builds. After every encounter  with Bowser, the player thinks that he or she has finally succeeded in finding the princess, only  to discover that she is famously “in another castle.” Meanwhile, every world and every encounter  with “Bowser” grows harder and harder, leaving the player incredulous and frustrated until finally,  unbelievably, he or she defeats another Bowser look­alike and finds the Princess safe and  sound. The story pays off in the wash of relief and empowerment that the players feels.   In the roughly 10 years since its release, I have used MGS3 as my go­to example for the  power of video games to people who do not regularly or have never played them, largely  because it follows the classical style so closely. Much like any Mario game, MGS3 presents to  the player a linear narrative through which the player approaches major challenges (i.e. boss  battles) in a set order, while giving the player certain mechanical freedoms set around these  scheduled narrative moments. The narrative for the original Super Mario Bros. for the NES is a  perfect example, pure in its utter simplicity: Bowser, King Koopa, has kidnapped Princess  Toadstool. You, as the plumber Mario, must fulfill your duty in rescuing her and returning her to  her castle. The brilliance of this bare­bones story is in the tension it builds. After every encounter  with Bowser, the player thinks that he or she has finally succeeded in finding the princess, only  to discover that she is famously “in another castle.” Meanwhile, every world and every encounter  with “Bowser” grows harder and harder, leaving the player incredulous and frustrated until finally,  unbelievably, he or she defeats another Bowser look­alike and finds the Princess safe and  sound. The story pays off in the wash of relief and empowerment that the players feels.   Nearly every major game since then has followed that pattern; the smart ones, like  MegaMan X, explicitly capitalize on it narratively (if you haven’t seen Egoraptor’s Sequelitis on it,  it’s well worth watching. His analysis is as funny as it is smart). Then along came the Metal Gear  series. The early MSX installments played fairly close to the original pattern: you play as the  heroic Solid Snake who must infiltrate Outer Heaven and destroy the Metal Gear weapon. You  acquire new keycards and new weapons along the way, as well as occasionally gaining more  health until, in a climactic final battle, you defeat the traitorous Big Boss. The first Metal Gear  Solid continues along the same lines, grow stronger, become the hero and save the day. Aside  from some plot twists, the overall pattern that the narrative creates follows Mario pretty closely.  And then came MGS2. Much of my understanding of 2 comes from the brilliant formal analysis  done by James Clinton Howell (which can be found at  http://www.deltaheadtranslation.com/MGS2/DOTM_TOC.htm). In short, MGS2 sets out to  disappoint the player at every turn. Though the game opens with Snake, the player quickly finds  himself shunted into the rookie boots of Raiden, a blonde, whining pretty­boy who differs from the  series’ hero in virtually every way (pun not intended). Various boss rooms are shaped identically  to those in MGS1 but the battle plays out completely differently. All this leads to the notoriously  strange endgame, wherein the game itself begins to glitch and fall apart, drawing comparisons  between the player and the VR­trained Raiden. Yet, in the end, Raiden defeats the villain and  saves the day; he still ends as a hero.  But this is all just an artistic maturation leading to MGS3, which finally (in my opinion)  reaches the pinnacle of the classical style largely by overturning it. In 3, you finally play as Big  Boss, the villain from the early MSX games, but while he’s still in his rookie days. The game  opens with his very first mission, the Virtuous Mission (the name itself begs interpretation),  wherein he, under orders by the US government, must retrieve a kidnapped Soviet scientist who  has been working on the ultimate weapon. This, naturally, ends up being a prototype Metal Gear.  But the mission goes utterly wrong when, scientist in tow, Snake crosses a rope bridge to return  to the drop point for extraction. The Boss, a legendary soldier and Snake’s mentor, approaches  him and reveals that she has changed sides. She easily disarms him and leaves him falling to  his death. Only here, at this point of ultimate defeat, does that game truly begin. Throughout the
story, Snake encounters The Boss several more times, and she defeats him in seconds every  time. The game would, then, seem to follow the classical progression of the weak hero honing  his skills and preparing for one final virtuous confrontation. Spoilers follow for MGS3 but  seriously, the game is old enough to be learning long division.   Snake finally meets The Boss face to face in a field of white flowers, where she reveals  to him that she has been following orders from the US all along, and has willingly sacrificed  herself for her country. She cannot be seen to fail, however, so should Snake fail to defeat her  within 15 minutes, jets will bomb them both. The battle ensues and Snake, finally able to defeat  this final boss, finds himself holding her gun, staring down at her as she closes her eyes. The  camera pulls back and all the player can see is Snake holding the gun over his fallen mentor  while beautiful white flowers sway around them. And that’s it. Nothing happens. And then, with  sickening insight, the player realizes that the game is making him pull the trigger. You yourself  must pull the trigger on the mentor your country betrayed. This is a moment that can only exist in  the space of video games.   But it must be pointed out, because this is where the limits of the classical style can best  be seen, that the player does not have a choice. You can pull the trigger or you can turn the  game off and walk away because the game is not about the player’s choices, but about Snake’s  choices. The classical style is largely an interactive movie, wherein player earns the next  segment of the static, linear narrative by overcoming the game’s challenges. Snake as a  character exists outside of the player’s agency, which is not to say that one can simply cut out  the gameplay and have an equally compelling object. By crawling through sewers and killing or  sparing potentially innocent guards, we do develop a kinship with Snake. We do not necessarily  enter his shoes wholesale, but we do start to identify with him and with the things he finds  himself compelled to do in a way that could not exist in another medium. Yet the game remains  ultimately teleological; it is a narrative about going from a to b and about the events that a static  character encounters between those points. The game ends in the same way for everybody.   Even other games that feature multiple endings tend to offer superficial choice systems.  Take for example, Dues Ex: Human Revolution. The player controls Adam Jensen’s gameplay  and combative choices, but aside from going through missions in any order the player chooses,  the only major character choice comes at the end of the game when the game presents the  player with 3 options crudely laid out as three comical red buttons. Because Adam has been his  own character for the entire game, no matter which choice the player makes, it ends up feeling  disappointing, because the overlap between character and player shifts so suddenly. The  classical pattern is then not necessarily the classical Hero’s Journey inasmuch as it is less  about the narrative than it is about the way the game presents the narrative. The best definition  that I can offer may also be the crudest, but here it is: the classical game is essentially an  interactive movie. Obviously this leaves a great deal of space unaddressed, including but not  limited to puzzle games, sports games, simulations, racing games and the like, but you’ll notice  that these other games tend to offer very thin narratives or even to eschew them altogether in  favor of competitive gameplay, whether it be racking up the most points or crossing the finish line  first.  The primary point of Papers, Please’s departure from these classical modes is its  masterful exploitation of what Ian Bogost terms in his excellent How to Do Things with Video
Games as procedural rhetoric. Given the recent explosion in popularity of procedurally generated  content or “roguelikes,” it bears pointing out that Bogost in no way means randomly generated  narrative, but rather that the procedures of the game, the actual mechanics, can tell the story as  much as the visuals or explicit exposition. The genius of Papers, Please lays in the focal point at  which its visuals, mechanics, narrative, and skill all meet. It is this focal point that I intend to  address most thoroughly, but I must preface this by saying that I by do not mean to claim that  Papers, Please is a perfect game. Or even that it is a fun game, as most people would say that  it’s painfully uninteresting. Or that it is great in any quantitative, hierarchical sense like those who  constantly try to bring dredge up whether or not this or that game is the “Citizen Kane of video  games.” I merely aim to point out that Papers, Please presents us with an utterly pure marriage  of the things that make games games as opposed to any other medium.   The metaphor that I think most of the game’s systems revolve around is that of the  hourglass. The player’s booth first presents a visual pinching point between the huddled masses  waiting to be processed and the vast open area behind, into which the the immigrants trickle into  like sand with painful slowness. Likewise the the player must always remain mindful of the  passing of time, as he must process a great deal of papers to meet his financial quota for the  day, otherwise he may not be able to provide his family with food or heat that night. Just as the  hourglass simultaneously represents both the steady movement of space and time, the player’s  booth in Papers, Please stands at the only point of moment on the entire game screen  (excluding some scheduled terrorist incidents).   Likewise the player’s ability and his moral code are utterly intertwined. The wife whose  husband has just gained entry might very well wander right past an unskilled player, thus  completely overlooking the complex moral choice the game presents. Or, on the other hand, a  player completely devoted to “beating” the game will find himself following every rule, because  the player can never be sure of anybody’s trustworthiness. Consider that the potentially “best” or  most desirable ending involves either the player’s complete trust in EZIC or his illegal flight (with  or without his family) to Obristan. Most players will find themselves following an uncomfortable  middle plath, nearly all of which lead to the Inspector’s arrest or execution.   But it is not so much the narrative itself, compelling as it may be, but the method of its  delivery that sets the game apart. Other games that have acquired “art­game” status have been  given the honor of supposedly breaking with the classical narrative tradition. Ian Bogost, in his  discussion of procedural rhetoric references the ever­popular Braid, while others have pointed to  Phil Fish’s Fez as examples of this newer style. I contest this on the grounds that these games  still hold on to the classical game vocabulary, not necessarily to the games’ detriment, but  certainly to the point that it is not the perfect marriage of mechanic and narrative that we find in  Papers, Please. Many argue that the basic mechanic in Braid, the ability to travel back and forth  through time, reflects the narrative’s preoccupation with regret. I agree with this only to the point  that the mechanic shares a theme with the narrative. The narrative itself is still told to the player  through books and visuals. The player never really learns about Tim through the gameplay, but  rather earns new insight into Tim by overcoming the games puzzles, in a fashion not unlike  sneaking to the next cutscene in MGS. And in order to Braid’s secret “real” ending, the player  must collect arbitrary stars by satisfying hidden conditions in the same way that one must simply
know how to get to the proper end of Starfox 64. And again, this does not make Papers, Please  the superior game, merely the one closer to one extreme end of a spectrum.   The stars in Braid represent perfectly the potential weakness in many games:  arbitrariness. One might argue that they represent something symbolic in Braid, but the point  remains that they are collectibles that don’t really make make sense from the point of  intersection between narrative and gameplay. People have been calling for an end to the  cutscene since Half Life 2, and I understand the argument; many argue that the cutscene is an  antique of an era where prerendered graphics still had the power to wow people when the  average in­game character looked like Cloud from FF7, or that it only serves to take one out of  the action. But most modern games adopt what amounts to a bandaid over the problem. Sure,  they might not abuse full hours of player time with cutscenes (MGS4 or Xenogears), but having  the player maintain visual control of their environment a la Bioshock Infinite is only superficially  different than taking full control of the camera. The central problematic of the classical era still  remains, the game still takes the shape of a centipede, where each segment of genuine  narrative action is separated from the next by rote game work such as fetchquests or shooting  segments that frequently end up being tonally at­odds with the central narrative (Infinite again). A  game with an ideal focal point like Papers, Please makes almost every choice and every test of  skill the Inspector encounters equally important, equally loaded with meaning.  And I think it is exactly this arbitrariness that represents the major dividing factor between  the two styles. We, as gamers, have become accustomed to ­ perhaps complacent with ­ the  arbitrary in games. Why, in Mario games, does Mario collect coins? Why do they pop out of  blocks? Why does he suddenly gain a life when he has amassed 100 of them? These games  revel in their strangeness, and these factors matter little to the games narrative, so we just  accept it. But turn to more adventure based games such as Mass Effect or Skyrim, games  which fall rather nicely between the two extremes. These games have perhaps ironically pushed  the boundaries of player interactivity in these digital worlds by harkening back to the days of the  text­based adventure, in which a player had complete control over their actions… so long as  those actions were an allowable keyword. As Jack Railton says in his (poorly named) The A­Z of  Cool Computer Games: “Because we know the rules and restrictions of everyday grammar it  seems unacceptable when commands such as ‘kick Gandalf up the arse’ are met with the  response ‘I do not know the work ‘kick.’” Now obviously this limitation is not really arbitrary, but  the result of human and computer limitations. Not every game (or any game, really) can know  the full range of the English language and prepare for every player action. Likewise when we look  at the now­familiar Mass Effect conversation wheel, we may lament the fact that what we as  players would like to see is not one of the listed options. These too are not totally arbitrary; it  would be hard to have apparently erratic commands in the wheel for every conversation like “give  me pie” or “the captain of the ship is the head of the ship,” especially in very tense moments. But  they are arbitrary in the sense that they shunt the action taking place back toward the more  classical mode of game design. These moments are still interactive movies, albeit ones where  we choose the scene we’d like to see.   It’s harder to say whether or not this is really a bad thing or merely a choice of design.  Most critics and artists agree that the arbitrary or extraneous in any filmic or written narrative  usually mars the flow of the work, and I cannot count the times people have recommended
movies to me by telling me that “its writing was just so tight.” If, for example, a filmmaker cut  away from the characters mid dialogue to a gun resting on the table next to them, we assume  that it will play a role in what is about to happen. In a gangster movie, we can predict that  perhaps both characters will reach for it at the same time. But if this were to happen in, say, a  romantic comedy taking place in white suburbia, and the gun never comes back into play, we  would likely react with confusion. It is the classic “Chekhov’s Gun” trope. In film an arbitrary  moment can come from any aspect of film, anywhere from the score to the writing to the editing.  But when we move into the space of video games, we have to understand that the interactivity of  the game ­ its mechanics ­ represent another facet of that. So does that make arbitrary  mechanics poor design? Not necessarily, and unfortunately I think that that argument is outside  the scope of this piece. But the tightness of the mechanics in Papers, Please does make the  argument that tight mechanics like tight writing can make for a more interesting experience.   I don’t know if it’s even possible to replicate that phenomenon on a regular basis in  games, or even whether or not that should be something that designers should strive for. It does,  however, show us that we have a great deal of unexplored space left to examine. I know that I  don’t have the answers, but I do hope that in scrutinizing the utterly unique phenomenon of game  narratives we can come to better understand how exactly we communicate with games and,  through them, with each otherNearly every major game since then has followed that pattern; the smart ones, like  MegaMan X, explicitly capitalize on it narratively (if you haven’t seen Egoraptor’s Sequelitis on it,  it’s well worth watching. His analysis is as funny as it is smart). Then along came the Metal Gear  series. The early MSX installments played fairly close to the original pattern: you play as the  heroic Solid Snake who must infiltrate Outer Heaven and destroy the Metal Gear weapon. You  acquire new keycards and new weapons along the way, as well as occasionally gaining more  health until, in a climactic final battle, you defeat the traitorous Big Boss. The first Metal Gear  Solid continues along the same lines, grow stronger, become the hero and save the day. Aside  from some plot twists, the overall pattern that the narrative creates follows Mario pretty closely.  And then came MGS2. Much of my understanding of 2 comes from the brilliant formal analysis  done by James Clinton Howell (which can be found at  http://www.deltaheadtranslation.com/MGS2/DOTM_TOC.htm). In short, MGS2 sets out to  disappoint the player at every turn. Though the game opens with Snake, the player quickly finds  himself shunted into the rookie boots of Raiden, a blonde, whining pretty­boy who differs from the  series’ hero in virtually every way (pun not intended). Various boss rooms are shaped identically  to those in MGS1 but the battle plays out completely differently. All this leads to the notoriously  strange endgame, wherein the game itself begins to glitch and fall apart, drawing comparisons  between the player and the VR­trained Raiden. Yet, in the end, Raiden defeats the villain and  saves the day; he still ends as a hero.  But this is all just an artistic maturation leading to MGS3, which finally (in my opinion)  reaches the pinnacle of the classical style largely by overturning it. In 3, you finally play as Big  Boss, the villain from the early MSX games, but while he’s still in his rookie days. The game  opens with his very first mission, the Virtuous Mission (the name itself begs interpretation),  wherein he, under orders by the US government, must retrieve a kidnapped Soviet scientist who  has been working on the ultimate weapon. This, naturally, ends up being a prototype Metal Gear.  But the mission goes utterly wrong when, scientist in tow, Snake crosses a rope bridge to return  to the drop point for extraction. The Boss, a legendary soldier and Snake’s mentor, approaches  him and reveals that she has changed sides. She easily disarms him and leaves him falling to  his death. Only here, at this point of ultimate defeat, does that game truly begin. Throughout the
story, Snake encounters The Boss several more times, and she defeats him in seconds every  time. The game would, then, seem to follow the classical progression of the weak hero honing  his skills and preparing for one final virtuous confrontation. Spoilers follow for MGS3 but  seriously, the game is old enough to be learning long division.   Snake finally meets The Boss face to face in a field of white flowers, where she reveals  to him that she has been following orders from the US all along, and has willingly sacrificed  herself for her country. She cannot be seen to fail, however, so should Snake fail to defeat her  within 15 minutes, jets will bomb them both. The battle ensues and Snake, finally able to defeat  this final boss, finds himself holding her gun, staring down at her as she closes her eyes. The  camera pulls back and all the player can see is Snake holding the gun over his fallen mentor  while beautiful white flowers sway around them. And that’s it. Nothing happens. And then, with  sickening insight, the player realizes that the game is making him pull the trigger. You yourself  must pull the trigger on the mentor your country betrayed. This is a moment that can only exist in  the space of video games.   But it must be pointed out, because this is where the limits of the classical style can best  be seen, that the player does not have a choice. You can pull the trigger or you can turn the  game off and walk away because the game is not about the player’s choices, but about Snake’s  choices. The classical style is largely an interactive movie, wherein player earns the next  segment of the static, linear narrative by overcoming the game’s challenges. Snake as a  character exists outside of the player’s agency, which is not to say that one can simply cut out  the gameplay and have an equally compelling object. By crawling through sewers and killing or  sparing potentially innocent guards, we do develop a kinship with Snake. We do not necessarily  enter his shoes wholesale, but we do start to identify with him and with the things he finds  himself compelled to do in a way that could not exist in another medium. Yet the game remains  ultimately teleological; it is a narrative about going from a to b and about the events that a static  character encounters between those points. The game ends in the same way for everybody.   Even other games that feature multiple endings tend to offer superficial choice systems.  Take for example, Dues Ex: Human Revolution. The player controls Adam Jensen’s gameplay  and combative choices, but aside from going through missions in any order the player chooses,  the only major character choice comes at the end of the game when the game presents the  player with 3 options crudely laid out as three comical red buttons. Because Adam has been his  own character for the entire game, no matter which choice the player makes, it ends up feeling  disappointing, because the overlap between character and player shifts so suddenly. The  classical pattern is then not necessarily the classical Hero’s Journey inasmuch as it is less  about the narrative than it is about the way the game presents the narrative. The best definition  that I can offer may also be the crudest, but here it is: the classical game is essentially an  interactive movie. Obviously this leaves a great deal of space unaddressed, including but not  limited to puzzle games, sports games, simulations, racing games and the like, but you’ll notice  that these other games tend to offer very thin narratives or even to eschew them altogether in  favor of competitive gameplay, whether it be racking up the most points or crossing the finish line  first.  The primary point of Papers, Please’s departure from these classical modes is its  masterful exploitation of what Ian Bogost terms in his excellent How to Do Things with Video
Games as procedural rhetoric. Given the recent explosion in popularity of procedurally generated  content or “roguelikes,” it bears pointing out that Bogost in no way means randomly generated  narrative, but rather that the procedures of the game, the actual mechanics, can tell the story as  much as the visuals or explicit exposition. The genius of Papers, Please lays in the focal point at  which its visuals, mechanics, narrative, and skill all meet. It is this focal point that I intend to  address most thoroughly, but I must preface this by saying that I by do not mean to claim that  Papers, Please is a perfect game. Or even that it is a fun game, as most people would say that  it’s painfully uninteresting. Or that it is great in any quantitative, hierarchical sense like those who  constantly try to bring dredge up whether or not this or that game is the “Citizen Kane of video  games.” I merely aim to point out that Papers, Please presents us with an utterly pure marriage  of the things that make games games as opposed to any other medium.   The metaphor that I think most of the game’s systems revolve around is that of the  hourglass. The player’s booth first presents a visual pinching point between the huddled masses  waiting to be processed and the vast open area behind, into which the the immigrants trickle into  like sand with painful slowness. Likewise the the player must always remain mindful of the  passing of time, as he must process a great deal of papers to meet his financial quota for the  day, otherwise he may not be able to provide his family with food or heat that night. Just as the  hourglass simultaneously represents both the steady movement of space and time, the player’s  booth in Papers, Please stands at the only point of moment on the entire game screen  (excluding some scheduled terrorist incidents).   Likewise the player’s ability and his moral code are utterly intertwined. The wife whose  husband has just gained entry might very well wander right past an unskilled player, thus  completely overlooking the complex moral choice the game presents. Or, on the other hand, a  player completely devoted to “beating” the game will find himself following every rule, because  the player can never be sure of anybody’s trustworthiness. Consider that the potentially “best” or  most desirable ending involves either the player’s complete trust in EZIC or his illegal flight (with  or without his family) to Obristan. Most players will find themselves following an uncomfortable  middle plath, nearly all of which lead to the Inspector’s arrest or execution.   But it is not so much the narrative itself, compelling as it may be, but the method of its  delivery that sets the game apart. Other games that have acquired “art­game” status have been  given the honor of supposedly breaking with the classical narrative tradition. Ian Bogost, in his  discussion of procedural rhetoric references the ever­popular Braid, while others have pointed to  Phil Fish’s Fez as examples of this newer style. I contest this on the grounds that these games  still hold on to the classical game vocabulary, not necessarily to the games’ detriment, but  certainly to the point that it is not the perfect marriage of mechanic and narrative that we find in  Papers, Please. Many argue that the basic mechanic in Braid, the ability to travel back and forth  through time, reflects the narrative’s preoccupation with regret. I agree with this only to the point  that the mechanic shares a theme with the narrative. The narrative itself is still told to the player  through books and visuals. The player never really learns about Tim through the gameplay, but  rather earns new insight into Tim by overcoming the games puzzles, in a fashion not unlike  sneaking to the next cutscene in MGS. And in order to Braid’s secret “real” ending, the player  must collect arbitrary stars by satisfying hidden conditions in the same way that one must simply
know how to get to the proper end of Starfox 64. And again, this does not make Papers, Please  the superior game, merely the one closer to one extreme end of a spectrum.   The stars in Braid represent perfectly the potential weakness in many games:  arbitrariness. One might argue that they represent something symbolic in Braid, but the point  remains that they are collectibles that don’t really make make sense from the point of  intersection between narrative and gameplay. People have been calling for an end to the  cutscene since Half Life 2, and I understand the argument; many argue that the cutscene is an  antique of an era where prerendered graphics still had the power to wow people when the  average in­game character looked like Cloud from FF7, or that it only serves to take one out of  the action. But most modern games adopt what amounts to a bandaid over the problem. Sure,  they might not abuse full hours of player time with cutscenes (MGS4 or Xenogears), but having  the player maintain visual control of their environment a la Bioshock Infinite is only superficially  different than taking full control of the camera. The central problematic of the classical era still  remains, the game still takes the shape of a centipede, where each segment of genuine  narrative action is separated from the next by rote game work such as fetchquests or shooting  segments that frequently end up being tonally at­odds with the central narrative (Infinite again). A  game with an ideal focal point like Papers, Please makes almost every choice and every test of  skill the Inspector encounters equally important, equally loaded with meaning.  And I think it is exactly this arbitrariness that represents the major dividing factor between  the two styles. We, as gamers, have become accustomed to ­ perhaps complacent with ­ the  arbitrary in games. Why, in Mario games, does Mario collect coins? Why do they pop out of  blocks? Why does he suddenly gain a life when he has amassed 100 of them? These games  revel in their strangeness, and these factors matter little to the games narrative, so we just  accept it. But turn to more adventure based games such as Mass Effect or Skyrim, games  which fall rather nicely between the two extremes. These games have perhaps ironically pushed  the boundaries of player interactivity in these digital worlds by harkening back to the days of the  text­based adventure, in which a player had complete control over their actions… so long as  those actions were an allowable keyword. As Jack Railton says in his (poorly named) The A­Z of  Cool Computer Games: “Because we know the rules and restrictions of everyday grammar it  seems unacceptable when commands such as ‘kick Gandalf up the arse’ are met with the  response ‘I do not know the work ‘kick.’” Now obviously this limitation is not really arbitrary, but  the result of human and computer limitations. Not every game (or any game, really) can know  the full range of the English language and prepare for every player action. Likewise when we look  at the now­familiar Mass Effect conversation wheel, we may lament the fact that what we as  players would like to see is not one of the listed options. These too are not totally arbitrary; it  would be hard to have apparently erratic commands in the wheel for every conversation like “give  me pie” or “the captain of the ship is the head of the ship,” especially in very tense moments. But  they are arbitrary in the sense that they shunt the action taking place back toward the more  classical mode of game design. These moments are still interactive movies, albeit ones where  we choose the scene we’d like to see.   It’s harder to say whether or not this is really a bad thing or merely a choice of design.  Most critics and artists agree that the arbitrary or extraneous in any filmic or written narrative  usually mars the flow of the work, and I cannot count the times people have recommended
movies to me by telling me that “its writing was just so tight.” If, for example, a filmmaker cut  away from the characters mid dialogue to a gun resting on the table next to them, we assume  that it will play a role in what is about to happen. In a gangster movie, we can predict that  perhaps both characters will reach for it at the same time. But if this were to happen in, say, a  romantic comedy taking place in white suburbia, and the gun never comes back into play, we  would likely react with confusion. It is the classic “Chekhov’s Gun” trope. In film an arbitrary  moment can come from any aspect of film, anywhere from the score to the writing to the editing.  But when we move into the space of video games, we have to understand that the interactivity of  the game ­ its mechanics ­ represent another facet of that. So does that make arbitrary  mechanics poor design? Not necessarily, and unfortunately I think that that argument is outside  the scope of this piece. But the tightness of the mechanics in Papers, Please does make the  argument that tight mechanics like tight writing can make for a more interesting experience.   I don’t know if it’s even possible to replicate that phenomenon on a regular basis in  games, or even whether or not that should be something that designers should strive for. It does,  however, show us that we have a great deal of unexplored space left to examine. I know that I  don’t have the answers, but I do hope that in scrutinizing the utterly unique phenomenon of game  narratives we can come to better understand how exactly we communicate with games and,  through them, with each other

Latest Jobs

Treyarch

Playa Vista, California
6.20.22
Audio Engineer

Digital Extremes

London, Ontario, Canada
6.20.22
Communications Director

High Moon Studios

Carlsbad, California
6.20.22
Senior Producer

Build a Rocket Boy Games

Edinburgh, Scotland
6.20.22
Lead UI Programmer
More Jobs   

CONNECT WITH US

Register for a
Subscribe to
Follow us

Game Developer Account

Game Developer Newsletter

@gamedevdotcom

Register for a

Game Developer Account

Gain full access to resources (events, white paper, webinars, reports, etc)
Single sign-on to all Informa products

Register
Subscribe to

Game Developer Newsletter

Get daily Game Developer top stories every morning straight into your inbox

Subscribe
Follow us

@gamedevdotcom

Follow us @gamedevdotcom to stay up-to-date with the latest news & insider information about events & more