informa
2 MIN READ
News

How G2A became one of the top sponsors on YouTube and Twitch

G2A's controversial status goes hand-in-hand with the streamers it sponsors on YouTube and Twitch. A few of them explain why the company became so essential to their operations.

“When I have a sponsor that is being accused and essentially proven of hurting developers; that contradicts what I believe in. It was very hard to walk away from G2A. They were easy to work with, paid me well for 10 five-second promotions a month, and removed a lot of financial concerns in my life. The deal allowed me to experiment more on my YouTube channel because I was receiving revenue from another source which was also quite liberating.”

- Streamer MrMattyPlays explaining why he won't do business with G2A anymore.

With all the recent developer frustration over key reseller G2A, it’s worth taking a step back and asking, how did this site become so popular to begin with?

While the company has made its name on hosting key resellers that sell games for far cheaper then their value on Steam, it’s also been engaged in heavy promotion with YouTube and Twitch streamers. Now, according to Kotaku’s Patrick Klepek, its growing negative reputation is making streamers second-guess their relationships with the company, often at a cost. 

Klepek’s story covers one of the sometimes under-discussed elements of G2A’s controversial business practices. Since the company has invested lots of its marketing resources on YouTube and Twitch personalities, (including YouTube's most popular gaming personality, PewDiePie), it's gained a set of spokespeople who lend it an air of authenticity that conflicts with developers’ frustrations with the company.  

In his reporting, Klepek says he’s spoken with multiple Twitch streamers and YouTube personalities, many of whom never wanted to do business with G2A, and some who only recently walked away from their deals. These deals are often very financially favorable to YouTubers, which has made cutting them off all the more difficult for those who can’t reconcile their discomfort with recent developer complaints. 

“We helped create a brand that gamers associate with cheap legitimate games,” says streamer Charlie Goldberg. “Too many of us are young and easily swayed by money. We don’t have managers or a team of people seeking out advertising deals. It’s just us.”

While developers over time have expressed frustration with those taking sponsorships with G2A, it’s worth reading Klepek’s full piece to see just how many of them grew to rely on the money in their own risky enterprise. 

For its part, G2A tells Kotaku that all of these concerns are simply “feedback that makes us stronger and better.”

Latest Jobs

Xbox Game Studios

Redmond, Washington
10.5.22
Technical Lighting Artist

Innogames

Hamburg, Germany
10.5.22
Game Designer - Elvenar

Bandai Namco Mobile

Barcelona, Spain
10.5.22
Principal 3D Animator

Cryptic Studios

Los Gatos, California
10.5.22
Staff Core Software Engineer
More Jobs   

CONNECT WITH US

Explore the
Subscribe to
Follow us

Game Developer Job Board

Game Developer Newsletter

@gamedevdotcom

Explore the

Game Developer Job Board

Browse open positions across the game industry or recruit new talent for your studio

Browse
Subscribe to

Game Developer Newsletter

Get daily Game Developer top stories every morning straight into your inbox

Subscribe
Follow us

@gamedevdotcom

Follow us @gamedevdotcom to stay up-to-date with the latest news & insider information about events & more